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by Desiree Baughman Desiree Baughman on December 21, 2012

'Tis the Season: How to Provide Value Through Twitter

December 21, 2012

TwitterIf you’ve turned on your television lately or hit the malls to do some holiday shopping, you’ve likely noticed a huge influx of non-profit organizations asking you for a donation.  There’s a good reason for this:  December is notoriously known for being the most “giving” month of the year.


While some marketers initially thought that consumers would be too involved in buying presents to donate, StayClassy released some stats from last year’s holiday season that proved otherwise:



  • Donors give 80% larger donations and gifts in December, on average

  • 33% of online donations and gifts are given in December


And for those of you businesses who may think that it’s too late to start fundraising, here’s an inspirational stat for you:



  • 10% of all donations were given in the last 3 days of the year


Fundraising for other organizations can be a fantastic way to get the word out about your business, and as we talk about in our e-book “How To Take Your Social Media To The Next Level”, social media sites like Twitter can be one of the best tools to use.


Companies are always using the support of others to help boost their own PR, and you shouldn’t neglect this opportunity too.  Here’s how you can both get the word out about your company and get people to donate to your important, chosen cause through Twitter:


Why Use Twitter?


Social media should obviously be used to draw in those donations.  If you remember the “Tweetsgiving” campaign back in 2008, then you’re familiar with how powerful this tool can be.  This campaign raised well over $10,000 in just 48 hours.


To get donations through Twitter, it’s all about crafting the right messages and setting up your streams appropriately so that you can keep tabs on your fundraising efforts.


Don’t make the mistake of simply describing your charity of choice and then throwing a link to your donation page – that’s not going to entice people to give.  You’ve got to create a catchy message that includes a catchy #hashtag that people can easily remember, and that they’ll want to share (i.e. “Tweetsgiving” is a pretty catchy hashtag).


Messaging


Include statistics to help prove your point, though go beyond trying to make your messages informational and make them more emotional.  People donate more when you pull at their heartstrings than if you just provide them with cold, hard facts.  Make note of the hardships that the people who will be supported with this money endure (i.e. how cold it is outside and how homeless individuals are affected) and how a donation of “as little as” can alleviate it.


As we mention in our book “The Immediate Solution To Lead Generation”, it’s important to also put a call to action on any donation request and make it seem timely.


Hashtags


Coming up with a catchy hashtag may take some time, but it’s definitely worth it.  As we discuss in our eBook “The Ultimate Cheat Sheet For Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn”, the first step to creating a great hashtag is to keep it short, but sweet.


If you can make it rhyme or sound similar to something else that’s common or trending, then you have a chance of making your hashtag go viral (i.e. If you had a website about David Hasselhoff, your hashtag could play on the #likeaboss hashtag and be #likeahoff).


Before putting that hashtag to full use, check in with sites like Hashtag.org to make sure that the tag isn’t already in use.

Desiree Baughman

Desiree Baughman

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